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HIgh in the Sky with the HealthNet Flight Crew
Written by Jared Pelletier
Last updated on November 13, 2013 @ 6:20PM
Created on November 13, 2013 @ 3:28PM

HealthNet crews are always standing by. When they get a call alerting them that someone needs help they take off.

Jared Copeland is a flight nurse. He said, "It gives you kind of a rush to know that you're needed now."

The adrenaline starts pumping and the crew gets locked in. High above the ground they're responsible for helping people as quickly as possible while also looking out for their own safety.

Flight Paramedic Dennis Wilson said, "You have to be able to separate knowing the patient is down there needing your help. You still have to look our for wires, towers, get the aircraft down on the ground, and then get out from it safely."

A lot of the pressure rests on the shoulders of the pilot. When the weather is bad it's his or her call whether to fly or not. They have the lives of everyone on the aircraft at their fingertips.

John Arisman is a pilot for HealthNet. He said, "My job is to ensure the safety of the crew and the aircraft. I need to make sure they get from point a to b and then back as quickly, prudently and legally as possible."

Once they've touched down that's when the real work begins. The medical staff has to asses the patient, stabilize them, load the person onto the aircraft, and then continue giving treatment while taking off.

It's a tough job, but crew members claim they wouldn't trade it for anything.

"It's very rewarding that we have the capabilities, training, and equipment to respond to the sick and injured in the area. We get to provide the advanced medical care that maybe they otherwise wouldn't get," said Copeland.

Many people call these men and women heroes, but they disagree. Crew members believe their just simply doing their jobs.

"It's something I've never thought of in any way, shape, or form. I just take a lot of extra training to do a good job," said Wilson.

They give most of the credit to the first responders. Once in awhile the flight crew will run into people they've helped. When that happens people often thank them for getting them out of a bad situation. That's what crew members claim makes the job worth the sacrifice.

"I don't know these people but when somebody comes up to you and gives you a compliment like that, it justifies everything I do here," said Arisman.

Whether or not they consider themselves heroes many people greatly appreciate all these men and women do to help save lives.

 


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