National News | Closings | Funerals | HighScore | Monday's Most Wanted | Crime Watch | TV Lisitngs | Lottery | Bio's | FCC File | More ›
 
 
   
 
Study: Heavy Drinking Speeds Up Memory Loss in Men
Written by Jared Pelletier
Last updated on January 17, 2014 @ 7:18PM
Created on January 17, 2014 @ 6:25PM

A new study shows that adult men who drink heavily might might be speeding up their memory loss by roughly six years.

If you're throwing back more than two and a half drinks a day you may want to think twice before your ability to think back in time is affected.

The study also showed that drinking isn't always bad for you, but the key is moderation. Researchers in Britain looked at 7,500 people and looked at how alcohol affected their memory over time. The testing began in 1997 and participants were looked at up until 2009.

Researchers evaluated participant's reasoning skills, verbal fluency, and short-term memory. The results showed that heavy drinkers around the age of 60 were equivalent cognitively to people who were six years older.

Many doctors aren't surprised. They warn people that alcohol is a drug which affects the entire body. That's why doctors recommend you think about how much your drinking before you take your next sip.

Dr. Victor Singzon is a family medicine doctor at United Hospital Center. He said, "Memory is a very important thing. Alcohol is a drug and it depresses the mind and recall in itself."

Many young adults are saying the result of the study are scary, and they make them think about how much alcohol they consume.

"It's not too surprising to hear, but it definitely makes you think twice about the decision you make now that will affect you later down the road," said WVU freshman Frank Csonka.

Matthew Smoot is a junior at WVU. He said, "Once you start getting into your mid to late twenties you should really start think about you body because that's your greatest asset. If your body goes, if your mind goes, than you have nothing."

Doctors also claim people with cognitive issues have an increased risk of having heart attacks or strokes.


Share
Add your Comment
You must have an active WDTV.COM user account to post comments. Please login to your account, or create your free account today!

Comments (0)
WVFX FOX10 on Facebook
WVFX FOX10 on Twitter
WDTV on YouTube
Contact WDTV
WDTV RSS Feeds
WDTV SMS
WDTV Mobile App