Students and organization 'Unite for IX'

MORGANTOWN, W. Va. (WDTV)- A new student group and local organizations met Wednesday evening at WVU to launch a new campaign called Unite for IX. They hope to bring more awareness to sexual harassment on campus and join forces with others in the community, in order to make the institution a safer place.

"Essentially we just want to spread awareness, we want to provide education with our students and we want to make it known that sexual assault is a problem,"said Shannon Cawley, Senator of the WVU Student Government Association.

Since more and more stories on sexual harassment and sexual assault in Hollywood have come out recently, some people say there needs to be more action taken on this matter.

That's why Planned Parenthood Generation Action and Planned Parenthood South Atlantic held an informational session at WVU on Wednesday night, to launch their campaign, Unite for IX.

"They wanted to do a campaign on campus that would things better for the students, to make WVU a safer place to learn," said Emily Thompson, Field Organizer.

This event was designed to inform potential partners, who may be interested in joining this.

"We are sending a list of four demands to the president's office to kind of demand better security and more heightened education," said Shannon Cawley, Senator of the WVU Student Government Association.

Cawley says she was a victim herself and had a fear of retaliation and disbelief from others. But now she wants to change that and help other students feel safe and okay to come forward.

"We just want to foster a community of support of belief because a lot of times what victims face and their biggest problem is people not believing them," she said.

According to the group, they will start getting more connected to students next semester so they can tackle this problem. Some of their demands include better lighting on campus, more security cameras and have engaging training sessions on how to prevent sexual harassment.

"We just need to get or show them that there's a lot of support on campus whether is students, faculty or staff and then support from the community to show so many people care about this and care about this issue," said Thompson.